TOURIST INFORMATION


SHANGHAI


Location
Shanghai literally means the city by the sea. Right in the middle of China's east coastline, Shanghai is an excellent sea and river port, boasting easy access to the vast hinterland.

The city is divided into two parts by the Huangpu River: Puxi (west of the Huangpu River) and Pudong (east of the Huangpu River). Puxi is the older part of the city and hosts the majority of shops, restaurants and museums. Pudong is the modern part, and is recognized for its rather unusual yet extremely impressive high-rises such as Shanghai's tallest buildings, the Shanghai International Financial Centre, Jinmao Building and the Oriental Pearl TV Tower.


Time
Shanghai is eight hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT+8).


Weather & Climate
With a pleasant northern subtropical maritime monsoon climate, Shanghai enjoys four distinct seasons, generous sunshine and abundant rainfall. Its spring and autumn are relatively short compared with summer and winter. The average annual temperature is 18 degrees Celsius.

Since the general period of the 'Plum Rain Season' is from mid-June to early July, we may expect a lot of rains during Mobile World Congress Shanghai. Due to the rains, the humidity runs between 80 and 90 per cent. At the same time, the air temperature is very high, ranging from 20 to 34 degrees Celsius.


Weather averages for Shanghai

Month

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Average high °C
(°F)

8
(46)

8
(46)

13
(55)

19
(66)

25
(77)

28 
(82)

32 
(90)

32 
(90)

28 
(82)

23 
(73)

17 
(63)

17 
(63)

Average low °C
(°F)


(34)


(34)


(39)

10 
(50)

15 
(59)

19 
(66)

23 
(73)

23 
(73)

19 
(66)

14 
(57)


(45)

2
(36)

Precipitation

mm 
(inches)

48 
(1.89)

58 
(2.28)

84 
(3.31)

94 
(3.7)

94 
(3.7)

180 
(7.09)

147 
(5.79)

142 
(5.59)

130 
(5.12)

71 
(2.8)

51 
(2.01)

36 
(1.42)


Currency
Chinese currency is called Renminbi (literally people's currency), often abbreviated as RMB. Credit cards can be accepted at most hotels, tourist shops and some department stores.

One can change money upon arrival at the international airports of Shanghai. Also most hotels offer foreign exchange services and exchange cash and travellers cheques. The Bank of China exchanges money and travellers cheques. Banking Hours: Monday to Friday, 09:00 to 17:00.


Electricity
Electricity is supplied at 220 volts, 50 cycles, which will burn 110-volt appliances. It is suggested to check before using an electrical appliance. The most common plug types are the dual and three-pointed prongs. Adapters are usually available in most of the hotels in Shanghai.


Health
We suggest you drinking bottled water but not tap water. Mineral water including major imported brands is readily available from supermarkets and convenience stores.


Visitor Visa Requirements
A passport is required for most international travel, so make sure yours is up-to-date. Visitors to mainland China require a passport that is valid for at least six months prior to entry. Please click here to find the local Chinese Embassy in your country for information on visa requirements.


Language
China is made up of 23 provinces with many dialects and a huge amount of internal migration. Mandarin Chinese is spoken by over 95% of the people in Shanghai while some local residents in Shanghai may only speak Shanghaiese. English is also used in trade, tourism and commerce.


Image Language eng

Useful Numbers

Country code

86

City code

21

Police

110

Fire

119

Ambulance

120

Local telephone number inquiry

114

Weather forecast

12121

Police service for traffic accidents

122

Shanghai tourism hotline

962020

Flight inquiry

96990

Free hotline for railway tickets booking

95105105

Shanghai Call Center

962288



A more comprehensive and up to date information about Shanghai can be found here.


Business etiquette in China


Colour
In the People’s Republic of China (PRC), the use of red ink implies provocation or being non-friendly; therefore it is advisable to avoid the use of red ink on any communications.


Business Attire
Standard business attire is quite formal but can be tailored to suit weather. Men should wear a shirt and tie and women should wear a dress or skirt and blouse. Suits and coats should be worn to official functions.


Gifts
Never present knives or scissors as a gift as these symbolise conflict. Letter-openers, however, seem to be an exception to the rule. Naturally, objects which carry a death association are inappropriate gifts. These objects include clocks and cut flowers, white objects such as bed linen and table cloths, and objects which come in a set of four. The number four carries a strong association with death, so it is important not to give a set of four. When wrapping gifts for Chinese people, never use white paper, as this signifies death and is regarded as inauspicious. Red or gold wrapping paper is probably the best colour to use for Chinese people.


Introductions
Business cards are essential when conducting business in China. When distributing or receiving business cards, use both hands as a mark of respect. When receiving business cards, always pause and read each card individually. Never place the card immediately into your pocket or wallet. Cards printed in both English and Chinese are preferred. Citizens of Chinese descent will usually have a three-syllable name. Chinese surnames precede given names. Hence, a man named Goh Tuck-seng should be referred to as Mr Goh.


Tipping
Tipping is not commonly expected in Mainland China. Service fee of around 15% of total will be charged in most of the international hotels and restaurants, so tipping option is depending on your own willingness.